Online Shoppers Prefer Amazon Search Over Google

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Recently, there have been some seismic shifts in the natural order when it comes to search. For many years, Google has been the undisputed king.

However, the “front door to the internet” is no longer on top when it comes to product searches.

Retail giant, Amazon, is now leading the way.

When we look at how ecommerce has grown in the past few years, it’s easy to see just why Amazon search is the preferred choice of consumers today.

6 Reasons Why Amazon is Dominating Product Search

While Google Ads continue to drive traffic, Google’s dominance is now under threat. Amazon has enjoyed an astonishing rise in search, especially when it comes to products.

Here are several key reasons why people are opting for Amazon search when it comes to online shopping.

1.    Ready to Buy

55% of online consumers start their search with Amazon. People that go to Google first are in the ‘research’ phase, whereas the people who go to Amazon first are further along the buyer’s journey. People on Amazon have buyer intent.

2.    Amazon Ads Get More Clicks

Data from Merkle indicates that users click on Amazon headline ads 42% more than they do on Google Ads. Furthermore, these ads from Amazon convert at more than three times the rate of Google’s ads.

This is tied to the previous point, where people are visiting Amazon with the intent to make a purchase. Therefore Amazon’s ads are more valuable than Google Ads.

3.    Mobile Commerce

One of the biggest causes of the increase in Amazon search dominance comes down to mobile use. Mobile commerce has grown year-over-year, and it is projected to account for more than 50% of all US ecommerce by the year 2021.

Considering that Amazon’s mobile app is among the most popular apps with millennials, we can expect the gap between Google and Amazon product searching to widen in the next few years.

4.    Ecommerce Personalization

Amazon’s ability to convert visitors is unparalleled. The company has truly mastered online retail, and much of that comes down to their smart strategies for ecommerce personalization.

35% of Amazon’s revenue comes from its advanced personalized recommendation engine.

5.    Social Commerce

The younger demographic is the most likely to buy online. Amazon has already made moves to leverage this by teaming up with Snapchat to offer visual search and social shopping.

6.    Voice Search

Although it hasn’t gone mainstream yet, voice search is definitely growing. Amazon is already established in this space, while Google is lagging behind. Projections from BI Intelligence estimate that more than 30% of adults will be using voice to make online payments by the year 2022. And remember your friend Alexa (aka Amazon Echo), she is already ready to take your order via voice command.

The Sky’s the Limit for Amazon Search Marketing

Amazon has come a long way from its humble beginnings. It has recently become only the second $1 trillion company and shows little signs of slowing down. With well-established services in publishing, content streaming, and marketing, their advertising clout is virtually unrivaled. By backing Snapchat ahead of Instagram Stories, Amazon is causing more disruption for the latter’s parent company, Facebook.

Now, it is muscling in on Google’s search territory, effectively causing a storm among the digital giants. But here’s the thing: Amazon is fantastic at serving the consumer. The customer-centric approach runs deep with Amazon, and it’s through the ability to offer great value on a personal level that it has been able to be so successful. That alone makes Amazon tough opposition for any company, even one as big as Google. There’s a new king in town, and when it comes to online shopping, Amazon may well rule for quite some time.

Developing Strong Insights in the World of Marketing

Consumers in Action

Consumers in Action

Throughout my Marketing career, I can’t count the number of times I’ve had a conversation with a client or colleague about insights. How are they defined? How are they developed? What’s the difference between a shopper insight and a consumer insight? What is the role of insights in Marketing? Merriam-Webster outlines the definition of insight as, “the act or result of apprehending the inner nature of things or of seeing intuitively.” Uncovering and defining insights plays an important role in Marketing, whether we are working on a new idea or concept, developing strategy for an item or brand launch, going to market with a new product or understanding current mindsets and behaviors of a target audience. True insights are backed by the proper time, effort and methodology that allow us to peek inside the minds of those we are trying to reach. It’s understanding how beliefs drive behavior – more specifically, what your target audience believes about you. It’s bridging the gap between behavior and beliefs.

Methodology techniques for developing insights can range greatly based on a number of factors including brand, category, budget and approach. Both quantitative and qualitative research, along with multiple internal and external data analytics, are studied to develop insights about what your target audience believes and why they behave as they do. Focus groups, shop-alongs, test labs, market basket or transaction data and loyalty program analysis are just some of the tools we use to help build true insights. A good mix of quantitative and qualitative data ensures no one gets too caught up in the numbers and statistics or, alternatively, focuses too much on perceptions and opinions.

I covered the definition of insights along with a topline snapshot of their development, but some of the most compelling conversations I mentioned above have been around exploring the distinction between shopper insights and consumer insights. Brands often try to tease out the differences between these two segments with the belief that consumers behave differently when shopping different retailers and channels. Someone shopping for cereal at Walmart may be driven solely by price, whereas someone shopping for cereal at Target may be driven by the treasure hunt and delight of buying a brand that isn’t on their list. And how is this different from shopping for cereal at Whole Foods? How about Costco? Or the .com channel? The differences lie in that consumer insights care about the brand experience, regardless of where it happens. Shopper insights are focused on what happens during the shopping experience. Shopper insights ask what, how, when and why people spend their money. Consumers insights seek to understand what emotion is evoked, what need state is satisfied or how the brand is perceived – without as much attention as to where that is happening.

Insights are one of the most fascinating parts of Marketing, in my humble opinion. Maybe it’s the anthropologist in me, but understanding behaviors and patterns, along with where it happens, is extremely interesting. Marketing without insights is comparable to action without vision. Each purchase transaction, click of the mouse or behavior observed gives us another opportunity to understand the beliefs and behaviors of those we are trying to reach.